Alan Watts – Four Ways to the Center

Alan Watts – Four Ways to the Center

“You know the more I study people’s religions, and I’ve studied them for an awful long time, the less I am inclined to quarrel with anybody’s position or belief, or way of practice. And this is also true of various philosophical systems. It’s all right that philosophers should argue with each other. I’m not going to quarrel with that either. But from my standpoint, the more I look at it, the more of the extraordinary variety of human opinions and ways of life, becomes comparable to a flower garden. Where these plants and trees and worms and birds and snails and slugs are playing all kinds of different games…” – Alan Watts.

Alan Wilson Watts was a British philosopher, writer, and speaker, best known as an interpreter and populariser of Eastern philosophy for a Western audience. Born in England in 1915, Alan was an Episcopalian priest who became the spokesperson for Eastern religions during the late 1950s and tumultuous 60s. His first book, The Spirit of Zen, however, was written in the 30s when Watts was just 20 years old. He went on to write more than twenty other books. He died in 1973.